Savage tells Trump: High-risk insurance polls for high-risk people' will solve Trumpcare

SAVAGE:

Let me explain something to you. On page 45 of my new book out tomorrow in bookstores: Trump’s War. I’m going to read you one paragraph. You know, sometimes a book comes along; it’s not just hype, not just stuffing between pages. Listen to me. Here’s what I wrote. Tell me if it’s still timely.

“Republicans in the House of Representatives have been repealing Obamacare for six years when it didn’t matter. Knowing it was merely a symbolic vote since Obama was still in the White House and Democrats held a majority in both the Senate. Even the RINO’s took the opportunity to show what tough conservatives they were for their longsuffering constituents. They voted six times to repeal the law in its entirety with almost fifty other votes to repeal or delay parts of its provisions. But now that the vote is no longer symbolic, repealing this monstrosity seems to have become a lot more complicated. The first proposal the RINO’s came up with was a budget bill that included repealing Obamacare and nine trillion dollars of new debt over the next ten years. Right out of George W. Bush’s playbook: The Republicans were ready to add as much to the National debt as Obama has over his eight year term. And it only took them three days. A few congressmen did push back. Senator Rand Paul actually voted against the senate bill to repeal.”

Page 45 from Trump’s War by Michael Savage

And I go on and on. This book is as fresh as it could possibly be. I never talk about Obamacare and why healthcare is so expensive. But I have a plan in this book that I have not read anywhere, or seen anywhere, that is common sense. That is necessary for everyone in America to hear me right now. I will repeat it if you missed it. When I was eighteen years old and I got a license to drive in New York state, I was the happiest person on the planet; until I was told what my insurance would cost me – automobile liability insurance. My dad’s insurance was – I don’t know what it was- it wasn’t very much. But because I was eighteen years old. And they knew through statistics that young men, teenagers that is, got into more accidents than older people, we had to pay a higher premium. We were called “assigned risk.” I had to buy insurance out of an assigned risk pool. I think it was for six months to a year; I’m not sure how long it was. Until I could prove I had a safe driving record then I would be put into a normal pool. I thought it was very unfair. I got very angry: ‘Why do I have to more than my father? I have no money. I’m poor.’ I said: ‘Why do I have to pay more?’ The answer is because the insurance company was not a social welfare agency. It was in business to make money. So, I paid more and drove my car very carefully.

Now, let’s come down to healthcare. If you lead a risky lifestyle, you should be put into an assigned risk pool and pay much more for copays and for premiums than a general population. That’s my solution: Tell me what’s wrong with that. Let’s say you are a race car driver. Shouldn’t you pay a higher premium than a woman in her fifties who’s not had an accident for healthcare? Of course, you should for your premiums and copays. Let’s say you are in another hazardous profession. Let’s say you are a boxer, martial artists, sportsman, football player. Shouldn’t you pay more for your insurance and copayments? Of course, you should, than let’s say the average person. Let us say in a lifestyle questionnaire. If they can get you to answer honestly; I don’t know who would. But let’s say you admit that you have multiple sexual partners. I don’t care if you’re hetero or homo; it doesn’t matter to me. You admit that you have multiple sexual partners on a regular basis: Shouldn’t you pay in a high risk pool (Called an assigned risk pool) more than someone who does not engage in risky behavior? Of course, you should. That would be sane. That would be prudent. And that would help balance the whole Trumpcare budget. This is all common sensical. It’s in the most important book of our time: Trump’s War. Trump warns it could take several years for health costs to drop. So, he and the Republicans are pushing the equivalent of Obamacare on us. In other words, he’s capitulated in plain english. Let’s not mince words here. Today, Donald Trump said it could take several years for health insurance prices to start to drop under an Obamacare care replacement plan he is promoting. Okay, this is not good. One of the biggest issues in having him elected was having Obamacare repealed. I didn’t make a big deal out of it, because I found it to be very boring. But now that we have a new president, we need a new plan. Just saying that more competition and less regulation will bring down the cost of care is not going to do it for us. Because under the new House bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, the tax penalty for people who do not buy insurance will be dropped immediately. Now what is that going to do? That’s going to make more healthy people pull out of the insurance marketplace, which will cause a spike in premiums, particularly for those who don’t get government subsidies.

Okay, but Michael Savage has a pretty clear solution. As I’m expressing on this radio program today. On the eve, or the cusp, of the publication of the most important plan for the battle for America Trump’s War as the book hits the bookstores tomorrow. Which is to create an assigned risk pool for those individuals in high risk professions or those who lead high risk lifestyles. Period. They would pay higher premiums and higher copayments. I don’t understand why this doesn’t make sense. I am very proud to tell you this is original to me. I have not heard it anywhere else; I have not read about it anywhere else. It seems to me that everyone has forgotten the obvious: That is to reward the healthy, and unfortunately, if you are in a very risky lifestyle, you have to pay more. It’s that simple.

Joe on WDRC raises a very important question about this. Go ahead, Joe.

CALLER JOE:

My question is: With regard to the high risk pools. When you talk about high risk professions. I’m a CPS worker here in the state of Connecticut and sometimes were in a risky situation if we walk in homes with drug addicts or people who have been on drugs and we have to help them.

SAVAGE:

Absolutely. A very important point. Your insurance would have to be subsidized by your fire department or police department.You should not be penalized for that type of high risk profession. That’s a public service.

CALLER JOE:

Yes, I understand that. You’re talking about a high risk pool. So what about corrections officers, police officers, firemen?

SAVAGE:

You’re raising a good point. Well, they’re all public servants. So, they would all have to be subsidized by the organization that they work for. Does that satisfy that question? I think it does.

CALLER JOE:

But I work for the State of Connecticut. So the State of Connecticut is going to subsidize my insurance?

SAVAGE:

They’re going to have to. Yes, they should have to. That is correct. You are a public servant. You are not like a public servant behind a desk in a motor vehicle bureau. You’re out on the frontlines in dangerous situations. You’re providing a great public service, and the state has to compensate you for higher premiums. I don’t see any problems with that.

Joe, read about it in Trump’s War. I’m going to send you a free copy. I think it’s a very good idea. I see nothing wrong with it. Never forget where you heard it first: A high-risk pool. It was called an assigned risk pool when I was kid, first driver’s license and had to pay more for car insurance. I am calling for a high-risk pool for Trumpcare. No one has discussed it except me. Maybe now you know why Donald Trump had dessert with me for over sixty minutes.

  • Anonymous

    My father was an insurance agent as are my two brothers so I am familiar with the assigned risk program. I am not sure if it is still in existence given the push to be so egalitarian and say it is not fair to charge young men and assume (despite all evidence that it is so) that they have few brains than an aardvark when they get behind the wheel.

    Nevertheless, I think this is an excellent idea – sure – if you are into putting yourself at risk because you have a death wish – by virtue of lifestyle – then, and your probability of getting truly seriously injured – even paralyzed and then needing nursing care for the rest of your life – why shouldn’t you pay more than someone who leads a more sedate, safe lifestyle?

    Great idea.

  • Anonymous

    My father was an insurance agent as are my two brothers so I am familiar with the assigned risk program. I am not sure if it is still in existence given the push to be so egalitarian and say it is not fair to charge young men and assume (despite all evidence that it is so) that they have few brains than an aardvark when they get behind the wheel.

    Nevertheless, I think this is an excellent idea – sure – if you are into putting yourself at risk because you have a death wish – by virtue of lifestyle – then, and your probability of getting truly seriously injured – even paralyzed and then needing nursing care for the rest of your life – why shouldn’t you pay more than someone who leads a more sedate, safe lifestyle?

    Great idea.

  • William Foster

    I worked 24 years as an insurance loss control rep for commercial accounts. High risk businesses, and those with bad loss records, landed in the assigned risk pool and understandably paid higher premiums. Ex. – crop dusters.

  • Dom Sanderson

    The high risk pools should be for those who have documented health conditions- such as diabetes or cancer and who are not part of a group plan. An individual with diabetes should pay more than a person who does not have any chronic diseases. The key to insurance is coverage for “unforeseen events”, if you have a chronic disease- that is not unforeseen and needs to be addressed in premium payments. All this talk of covering preexisting conditions- is essentially shifting costs from the unhealthy to everyone else.

    • Anonymous

      So if your born with DNA that makes you high risk, you pay more?
      Savage grew out of the age category that made him high risk, you can’t grow out of your DNA.

      Or if you get injured in a car accident that is not your fault, and these injuries lead to permanent disability, that means you are now in a high risk health care and pay more?

      At some point in life we all will become “unhealthy “. People don’t die of cancer, the die of side effects like dehydration.

      • Dom Sanderson

        Where did I mention DNA or genetics? Let me know if you want to discuss BRCA 1 or 2 mutations and insurability.

        If you do not have insurance and you get hit by a car- then yes your injuries put you into a higher risk pool than someone who doesn’t have those injuries.

        You do not understand the concept of insurance,

  • RANDY

    it isn’t as hard as you think

    • Anonymous

      Then simply explain it…
      Are we’re going to introduce food police and sound police and sanctuary city police to patrol and give us tickets for what they rule as high risk living?

      If we spend a weekend on vacation in SF we have to increase our health care coverage?

    • biilyjoe

      The TRAITOR IN CHIEF went on national news with that mesmerized- by- their mullah Shill reporter just 3 days before the Election and he seditiously instructed Illegals to vote and that no one in this administration would/could even trace them. Would that Demon waste his time doing so if he didn’t think they needed such a push by their Caliph in the oval office ?

  • Lynn

    A big one is Substance abuse treatment. There is no way that should ever be on any health plan. Insurance rates should go down significantly for all to delete that item.

  • Phil

    Won’t work and here’s why: First of all, who is going to compile the list of what is considered high risk? Secondly, the first time someone is told they are high risk, in will come the lawyer/statistician quoting statistics showing that other professions prove higher risks for disease or injury than those considered “high risk”. i.e. statistics might show that someone sitting behind a desk for a living is more at risk of developing and or dying of coronary heart disease than say a stunt pilot’s risk of being injured in a plane crash. The list of statistics would be endless as would be the lawsuits of those being considered high risk.

  • Deplorably Optimistic.

    Why not address the cost issue, cost of healthcare, cost of drugs, cost of insurance? If there was true competition, capitalism would work, too much collusion going on between healthcare and insurance. How else can you explain the hospitals cut rates for cash paying clients, or explain why knee replacement in the UK is under $10,000, even less in Spain, while in the US its list price is $40,000 to 100,000

  • Casey Heyward

    What about people like me, who believe that doctors and pharmaceuticals are a large (if not the largest) part of the problem? Am I considered high risk just because I don’t want to take their pharmaceutical drugs and follow what they call “traditional” medicine?

    If I refuse my doctors advice to take cholesterol medicine, because I think cholesterol medicine is a hoax and scam…. am I now high risk?

    You see, the problem is that we lose our individual freedom when we have to do it “your way” in order to not be considered “high risk”.